Men's Health

Please Read below education and prices for Low Testostorone, Erectile Dysfunction, and BPH testing and monitoring

 

 

Initial w/labs $145
Every three month F/U w/refill $95
Erectile Disfunction  
Low Testosterone

 

Low Testosterone or Low “T”

 

What Is Testosterone and Why Does It Decline?

Testosterone is a hormone. It's what puts hair on a man's chest. It's the force behind his sex drive.

During puberty, testosterone helps build a man's muscles, deepens his voice, and boosts the size of his penis and testes. In adulthood, it keeps a man's muscles and bones strong and maintains his interest in sex.

After age 30, most men begin to experience a gradual decline in testosterone. A decrease in sex drive sometimes accompanies the drop in testosterone, leading many men to mistakenly believe that their loss of interest in sex is simply due to getting older.

A lot of the symptoms are mirrored by other medical problems. Low testosterone can be attributed them to low testosterone, but diabetes, depression, high blood pressure, and coronary artery disease.

Low Testosterone: How Low Is Too Low?

The bottom of a man's normal total testosterone range is about 300 nanograms per deciliter (ng/dL). The upper limit is about 800ng/dL depending on the lab.

A lower-than-normal score on a blood test can be caused by a number of conditions, including:

  • Injury to the testicles
  • Testicular cancer or treatment for testicular cancer
  • Hormonal disorders
  • Infection
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Chronic liver or kidney disease
  • Type II diabetes
  • Obesity
  • Osteoporosis

Doctors will want to rule out any such possible explanations for symptoms before blaming them on low testosterone. They will also want to order a specific blood test to determine a man's testosterone level.

Low Testosterone Treatment

Having a gradual decline in your testosterone level as you age is to be expected. Treatment is sometimes considered if you're experiencing symptoms related to low testosterone.

  • Hormone injections

  • Testosterone replacement

  • May also have topical gels

Hormone replacement is safe as long as you get careful monitoring. Also replacement therapy can avg $50- $400 depending on insurance. However getting tested is first step.

www.webmd/lowt.com

Erectile Dysfunction

If you have low T, your levels of the male sex hormone, testosterone, drop below normal. When that happens it may affect your sex life. Your sex drive could go down. And you might develop erectile dysfunction (ED).

Men with ED have trouble getting or maintaining an erection suitable for sex.

ED Has Many Causes

It's important to remember that low T isn't the only cause of ED.

The most common cause of ED is reduce blood flow to the penis due to chronic conditions such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, obesity, heart disease, and hardening of the arteries.  

Psychological problems such as depression, anxiety, and relationship issues are also possible causes of ED. So are multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injuries, chronic back pain, and other neurological conditions.

Testosterone Replacement Therapy and ED

If your testosterone level measures in the normal range, raising it through testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) probably won't help your ED. Instead, you'll have to look for and address other causes.

For men who do have low testosterone levels, TRT has a better track record of restoring a man's sex drive than overcoming ED.

While many men on TRT do report improvements in their erections, they often need added help from ED drugs known as PDE-5 inhibitors, such as:

  • Viagra (sildenafil)
  • Levetra (vardenafil)
  • Cialas (tadalafil)
  • Stendra (avanafil)

These drugs encourage erections by increasing blood flow to the penis. Some men with low T, on the other hand, don't respond to these drugs without also undergoing TRT.

Some research suggests that erection improvements that result from TRT may not last over the long term. Can be lifelong.

Treating low testosterone can improve a man's sex life by restoring his libido and brightening his mood, thereby renewing his interest in sex.

www.webmd/ed.com

 

BPH (Benign Prostate Hyperplasia)

 

As you get older, your body changes in ways you can’t always control. For most men, one of those changes is that the prostate gets bigger.

It’s a natural part of aging, but at some point, it can lead to a condition called BPH, or benign prostatic hyperplasia.

Your prostate surrounds part of your urethra, the tube that carries urine and semen out of your penis when you have BPH, your prostate is larger than usual, which squeezes the urethra. This can cause a weak stream when you pee and cause you to wake up a lot at night to go to the bathroom.

BPH isn’t prostate cancer and doesn’t make you more likely to get it.

It’s a common condition, especially in older men, and there are a lot of treatments for it, from lifestyle changes to surgery. Your doctor can help you choose the best care based on your age, health, and how the condition affects you.

Symptoms

As the prostate gets larger, it starts to pinch the urethra. This causes symptoms that affect your urine flow, such as:

  • Dribbling when you finish
  • A hard time getting started
  • A weak stream, or you pee in stops and starts

When your urethra is squeezed, it also means your bladder has to work harder to push urine out. Over time, the bladder muscles get weak, which makes it harder for it to empty. This can lead to:

  • Feeling like you still have to pee even after you just went
  • Having to go too often -- eight or more times a day
  • Incontinence (when you don’t have control over when you pee)
  • An urgent need to pee, all of a sudden
  • You wake up several times a night to pee

A larger prostate doesn’t mean you’ll have more or worse symptoms. It’s different for each person. In fact, some men with very large prostates have few, if any, issues.

Diagnosis and Tests

Your doctor will first talk to you about your personal and family medical history. You might also fill out a survey, answering questions about your symptoms and how they affect you daily.

Next, your doctor will do a physical exam. This may include a digital rectal exam. During this, he puts on a glove and gently inserts one finger into your rectum to check the size and shape of your prostate.

Basic tests: Your doctor may start with one or more of these:

  • Blood tests to check for kidney problems
  • Urine tests to look for infection or other problems that could be causing your symptoms
  • PSA (prostate-specific antigen) blood test. High PSA levels may be a sign of a larger-than-usual prostate. A doctor can also order it as screening for prostate cancer.

Treatments

How your doctor handles your case varies based on your age, health, the size of your prostate, and how BPH affects you. If your symptoms don’t bother you too much, you can put off treatment and see how it goes.

Lifestyle changes: You may want to start with things you can control. For example, you can:

  • Do exercises to strengthen your pelvic floor muscles
  • Lower the amount of fluids you drink, especially before you go out or go to bed
  • Drink less caffeine and alcohol

Medicine: For mild to moderate BPH, your doctor might suggest medicine. Some medications work by relaxing the muscles in your prostate and bladder. Others help shrink your prostate. For some men, it takes a mix of medicines to get the best results.

www.webmd/bph.com